Never, since man has walked upright, have people all over the globe had more educational advantages or more opportunities to practice advanced social and interpersonal skills. And yet, for the most part, we still have not learned to look past the obvious, to see beyond the exterior shell of our fellow man, and to discover the worth of the real travel industry research person.

 

We seem consumed by the superficial. We worry incessantly (to the tune of billions of dollars every year in "cures" and "helps") about being too fat, too thin, too tall, too short, too old, too young.

 

Men are worried about their hairlines or their baldness, or they dwell on the size of their shoulders. They build their biceps, often at the expense of their brains. Consider athletes who are so determined to win that they will sacrifice their Day Trip to Macau futures for anabolic steroids. That's buying the "dream" but paying for it with a life.

 

Women wear bigger shoulder pads to offset the width of their hips, and they're nervous about their bra sizes. They'll sacrifice on groceries to have acrylic fingernails or a tan in the dead of winter. And everyone is fussing about their hair. It's too long, too short, too curly, too straight, too dark, too light, too fine, too coarse. So, by the millions, we're having everything changed to something it isn't.

 

Plastic surgeons, the executives of some the best beauty centre big cosmetic companies, and owners of spas and gyms are living opulently in mansions and on yachts, and it's all being paid for by our national craziness about what we look like.